Top Products for Summer Promotions

Summer is just around the corner and is the ultimate season to promote your business. From golf outings to travel promotions to company picnics to simply saying thank you to your most valued customers, summer is a great time to spread the word about your company. When considering promotions and events for the summer, make sure to incorporate a promotional item to maximize the exposure of your brand and extend the life of your promotion.

Finding the perfect item to complement your message, and incorporating that into your overall theme, can be a challenge. Consider some of these product ideas as a starting point to begin the creative process of establishing an effective summer marketing campaign for your brand.

The top five products to put your logo on this summer:

1. Umbrellas – They’re functional, unisex and offer essential protection during the rainy season. And, they are a no brainer for golf outings and picnics. From promotional folding styles to high quality windproof golf options, there is sure to be an umbrella to fit your budget. Whether it showcases one logo or assists in delivering a broader communication, umbrellas provide a large canvas to amplify your marketing message.

2. Chairs – Not always the first product idea to come to mind, chairs are a unique, yet useful gift to give in the summer. Great for beach trips, sporting events and picnics, a promotional chair is an item the recipient is going to use over and over and is likely going to recall the name of the advertiser who gave it to him or her. You can be that advertiser.

3. Towels – Nothing says summer like the beach! Whether you are planning a travel promotion or beach event, or just want to incorporate a beach theme into your campaign, towels provide the maximum amount of advertising space for your money. Great for launching a new product or service, towels allow you to create a walking billboard for your organization or message.

4. Sport Bottles – Reusable and refreshing, sport bottles are a great transportable item for the office frequenter or the weekend warrior. Add your logo and use it as a giveaway for a marathon or walk, outdoor concert, or wellness program. Sport bottles come in many styles and color combinations, you are sure to find one that will complement your brand.

5. Cinches – Who doesn’t have a need for a fun and portable bag to tote their items around in? Cinches have become popular in retail and even more popular in the promotional world. They offer functionality at a great price point, and can be used as packaging for new products, marketing literature, or other promotional items. They are ideal for any youthful market and can be easily incorporated into any marketing program.

Don’t take a vacation from promoting your brand in the summer. Instead, extend the fun of summer by creating a marketing campaign that ties into the relaxed atmosphere summer brings. Be sure to pick products to support your initiative that will be used over and over again by the recipient.

Best Promotions has a great selection of summer promotional products at multiple price points to assist you in your search. http://www.bestpromotions.com/products/browsecategory/293/

Achieve Your Marketing Goals Using Promotional Products

Promoting your business has become very crucial for escalating it towards new heights in today’s competitive world. Although there are a number of ways to do it, but there a number of things which have to be followed in order to get the promotion in the right direction. Out of all the ways that are available, use of promotional products is considered as one of the best way of promoting any business. There are numerous reasons to adopt campaigns with giveaways, below are some of the prime ones:

o Customer relationship management – Managing relationships with customers is of prime importance for running any successful enterprise. If you distribute these items to your already existing as well as budding customers, it can really help you in building long term relationships with your customers.

o Enhanced goodwill and image – If you distribute these to your customers from time-to-time, your image in the market will get better and this in turn will enhance the overall goodwill of your business.

o Fundraising – By distributing these from time-to-time, you can enjoy a good reputation in the market, and this can really help you in raising funds from the secondary markets of your vicinity.

o Launch your new products and services by the way of promotion – Sometimes you may want to launch a new product or service, but you may not be aware of its success. In that case, initially you can float it in the market as a promotional item of your company and later, if its response is good, you can add it to your portfolio of products and services. This will give you a two way benefit. First of all, your business will get promoted through this item. Secondly, you will get customer feedback from the market.

o Motivate your employees – You can deploy these as a tool for rewarding employees which perform better than others. This will further motivate them to work harder, as well as other non performing employees to become eligible for getting rewards.

o Motivate your down line – Every business becomes successful by the help of dealers, sub-dealers and retailers. You can give promotional items to those who show dazzling sales records. This will show your gratitude towards them, and will motivate them to continue their excellent sales track.

All the above stated ways have proved to be the best ways of enhancing business activities as well as profits and using promotional products will help you achieve this goal.

Ways to Innovate in the Product Lifecycle

In “Dealing with Darwin”, marketing guru Geoffrey Moore, describes three categories of innovation – Product, Customer Intimacy and Process.Moore achieved prominence as an expert in the field of new product introductions when he identified the chasm – a period of re-invention before disruptive product categories crossed into mainstream acceptance.Hewlett-Packard and Motorola plus others were keen to know why some product concepts crossed into mass markets whilst others failed. Moore answered the question and influenced a generation in Silicon Valley.”Dealing With Darwin” is about the dynamics of products once they become established and the levers that can be pulled to achieve success.Here are the three phases and twelve levers that Moore identifiedProduct Phase.Disruption Innovation – think big picture – think big problems. The aeroplane solved the problem of travelling large distances across open water at high speed and low cost. Innovation at this point exploits the confluence of new ideas and drags entire infrastructures in it’s’ wake. To embed air travel we also needed oil refining for fuel, airport construction for takeoff and landing and radio communication for navigation.Disruptive Innovation demands visionaries – people who sense with every fibre of their being that their work will make the world a better place. Whole industries are created from successful disruptions, others quietly dwindle away. In reality most disruptions fail but the successes are spectacular. All products were at one point in the cycle disruptions to what went before.Application Innovation – this is the first point at which a disruption starts to deliver some value add and a modest financial return. The Wright Brothers could envisage the age of winged transport but first they had to make their invention work in the commercial world.This is done by focussing to the point of obsession on the needs of a bull’s eye target market segment. The earliest aeroplanes were perfect for a single application of overwhelming significance. They could fly above the enemy during the Great War. Armies everywhere could instantly spot the application. Planes were rapidly adapted to carry heavy guns, fly further and higher and manoeuvre out of trouble. Armies also had deep pockets. Successful military applications lead to interest from postal services and farmers. Aeroplanes became new pleasure pursuit for the wealthy.Product Innovation – the point when it is economically viable to invest in the changes needed to move into mainstream markets. Innovation switches to product features, performance and the establishment of key market price points.Competitors and variants will enter the market to the point where a new Category of products is firmly established. Competition in this phase is ferocious. Attention must also turn to innovation in sales channels through which the greatest number of customers can gain access to the product at the keenest price.Platform Innovation – once a category has become established a market leader will soon emerge. Successful companies at this point innovate by establishing de facto and de jure standards for the entire market. In the railway, motor car, aeroplane and IT revolutions standards have made it safer for new entrants to participate. Thousands of software developers and value added resellers came into existence once Microsoft had initiated the standards in operating systems, for example.This cycle of phases was dubbed the Technology Adoption Lifecycle by Geoffrey Moore in his book “Crossing the Chasm”. The original thinking about product lifecycles began in of all places the potato seed market. Moore wondered why some products in IT made it to the mainstream and others didn’t. His view is that the successful must win in the Innovation Stakes at each stage – Innovation is not an event it’s a process.This section covers the four elements of Customer Intimacy on the top of the diagram above.These innovations extend beyond product innovation. Assume that a product category has been successfully launched and is now seeking to maintain peak level sales. With every periodic dip in sales new ideas are required.Customer Intimacy.Line Extension – in the development of the motor car, sales slowed after the early market became saturated. Designers and manufacturers were forced to uncover new customer segments. The successes were many and are taken for granted today but were startling in their day – sports cars for affluent young rakes, small family cars, camper vans. The list could go on. Line extension takes the basic concept and customises it for deeper market penetration by accessing more identifiable niches.Enhancement Innovation – eventually line innovation becomes exhausted so switches to differentiation on features – heated seats, sun roofs, ABS – and on and on. In every category in this phase marketers want to know about usage. Focus groups, surveys, regional pilots all are put in place to observe and test buyer behaviour. Enhancements are relatively easy to copy so advantage in this phase is more difficult to sustain.Marketing Innovation – eventually categories resolve into fewer and fewer participants. The fight for market share once categories are so well established switches to innovation in marketing. In this phase new thought is given to engagement with customers at a psychological level in order to aggregate buyers into loose federations around brands. Innovation and artistic creativity blend here. Advertising in particular demonstrates how acutely attuned to markets the manufacturers have become.Experiential Innovation – in order to sustain internal commitment to a brand, manufacturers eventually innovate ways to actively involve clients with physical experiences rather that remote touch through marketing. Mercedes Benz, for example, now incentivises the collection of vehicles from their factory. It is even possible to follow your own specific vehicle, with its personally selected options, through the entire manufacturing process. Watching it come off the production line must be like being present at a birth.These four sub-categories of innovation are about the exploration of ever deeper intimacy with the customer journey from first awareness through to eventual recommendation.In “Dealing With Darwin” Geoffrey Moore categorises innovation into three phases.When a product has entered the mainstream, innovation takes place by increasing customer intimacy and through process improvement.Process Innovation.Value Engineering Innovation.Once a product category has established itself and the main players have emerged they then enter into fierce competition. Innovation turns to delivering the product at lower cost. For example, a supermarket chain will try to recreate the richness and texture of a popular cake by using cheaper ingredients. If the customer is not able to perceive significant differences from the original then some form of value will have been engineered into the process.Integration Innovation.Cost can be further reduced and processes simplified if tasks and components can be integrated together. In the motor industry the components used in one model are designed to be easily reconfigured for use in other models. The more manufacturing can be made modular then the production of the standard building block components gets cheaper as volume increases.Process Innovation.In this phase markets will be approaching near commodity status so the only way to drive volume up and price down is the operationally more efficient. Deming pioneered work in this phase under the title TQM – total quality management. Six Sigma and others attempt to do the same thing by streamlining processes to remove unnecessary steps.Value Migration.In this phase innovation occurs when value is delivered in new ways to disrupt the traditional buying experience. Typically this means a shift to delivery as a service rather than a product. Telephone answering machines were gradually replaced by the telephone companies offering a dial back service to collect messages so that no revenue was lost from unanswered calls.The phases help identify where a product is in the lifecycle and the twelve types describe the broad type of innovation that will take the product deeper into the target market.